Need Your Loving

Composer: John Deacon
Meter: 4/4
Key: E-major
Form:

 Intro | Verse | Verse || Bridge | Verse | Chorus |
  | Solo (Verse)' | Verse - Chorus' ||

|| : Spacer

This song together with Crazy Little Thing (and partly Don't Try Suicide) represent the "retro" side of the Game album, right on the footsteps of Dreamers Ball. This time the chosen style is the beat of the early sixties, even if the arrangement, the guitar sound and the whole production is more up-to-date. (Try to replace the title phrase with "please please me oh yeah..." (Beatles). I belive the song even with simplified production could have became one of the more memorable hit songs of the beat era. In 1980 being released as third single and months after the album it couldn't explode too big.
The form seems to be model-like until the first Chorus. The Chorus is developed out of the Verse's last phrase (ie. the the title phrase).
The bass and the drums keep it very basic, except some short figures, syncopations. The only section with vocal harmonies is the Chorus.
The key of E-major and the II-IV progression in the Bridge creates a crossrelation with the not-much-later Deaky hitsong "Breakfree" (1984).
 

Walkthrough

Intro
It consists of two iteration of the two measure riff that starts the Verse, and closes it as well. The heavily syncopated riff consists of power chords. The first downbeat features bass and drums, it is followed by guitar in solo for until the downbeat of the second measure where second eletric guitar, an acoustic guitar, bass and drums ensemble join the music, also a short piece of lead vocal. As so many times we saw already, the first chord suggests the home key.
The syncopated rhythm figure:

1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1
* **** * * ** * *


Verse
It is twelve measures long (2+2+4+2+2, AABCA').The last phrase works as a spacer introducing the second Verse. The lead vocal is strangely reverbed. The Verse starts with two riffs with lead vocal that mimicks it with "blue" bent melodic third. The chords are simple I-IV-V chords.

E:
/------- 2x -------\\
| E5   | C#5 Bsus4 |
| I    |"vi"  V    |

| A   | B   | A   | B    |
| IV  | V   | IV  | V    |

| E   | A  B |
| I   | IV V |

| E5   | C#5 Bsus4 |
| I    |"vi"  V    |

Second Verse is added Spacer 1.
Third Verse is closed differently by spacer-like guitar chords. The chord progression repeats the preceding phrase, the B chord is played done half-beat earlier. This rhythmic twist is brought further in the Chorus next to come. Note the title phrase is absent from the Verses not followed by a Chorus, except the solo-Verse.

Solo-Verse
This is mainly the same with Verse except the first phrase is a triple one, and the the riff is simplied to two power chords, but appears in the original form to close the section.

/---- 3x ------\\
| E5   |  C#5  |
| I    | "vi"  |

| A   | B   | A   | B    |
| IV  | V   | IV  | V    |

| E   | A  B |
| I   | IV V |

| E5   | C#5 Bsus4 |
| I    |"vi"  V    |

Roger adds extra cymbals from measure five. Solo guitar goes into three part harmony in measure nine (after two measures of unisono "harmony"). The solo closes on the downbeat of measure 11, where the lead vocal returns for two(+) measures with the title-phrase.

Spacer
Second Verse is added a two measure break-like spacer.

| A    | B1...E1 |
| IV   |  "V>I"  |

This same Spacer closes the song.

Bridge
There is only one Bridge in the song and it is twelve measures long. Subtly influented (IMO) by Crazy Little Thing we find here a Bridge starting on the bVI chord, which creats a modulation-like feeling reinforced by further "alian" chords. Note the melodic crossrelation between G and G#. Similarly to the Verse the Bridge starts with a riff-driven double-phrase. In this double phrase the "E-string" riff is restricted to the even-numbered measures, while lead vocal stays in the first and third measures.

/----------- 2x ------------\\
| C    | -    | E1...| -    |
| bVI  | -    | "I"  | -    |
 

| D   | -   | F#  | -   | A   | -   | B   | -   |
|bVII | -   |V-of-V     | IV  | -   | V   | -   |

Note the on-beat - off-beat play between the lead vocal and the intruments in the last measure. Before that figure the instruments hold a one measure pause. While this section is harmonically the most interesting, the harmonic rhythm slows down to a constant one chord change in every two measure.

Chorus
This square eight measure section is developed from the title phrase that closes the Verses followed by Choruses. In the section-opening double-phrase the chords, the lead vocal, and the syncopation are taken from of the last phrase of the Verse. The lead vocal is varied for the second phrase.

/---- 2x ----\\
| E   | A  B |
| I   | IV V |

| G#  | c#   | A   | B   |
V-of-vi vi   | IV  | V   |

Note the chromatic descending (from C# to A) inner voice in measure six. Again the ending is open and resolved on the downbeat of next section.

Verse-Chorus'
The song end with the last Verse cleverly segued into a shortened version of the Chorus. The syncopated accents are omitted. The lead melody is subtly varied in measure six, where the G# chord is resolved to A instead of the original c#. Note: this time no vocal harmonies.

From m.9 of Verse, m.1 of Chorus':

/---- 2x ----\\
| E   | A  B |
| I   | IV V |

| G#   | A  B |
V-of-vi IV  V |

Spacer

| A    | B1...E1 |
| IV   | "V>I"   |

The song closes on a third beat.